Category

Survey Design

Category

What Is Survey Sampling? Surveys would be meaningless and incomplete without accounting for the respondents that they’re aimed at. The best survey design practices keep the target population at the core of their thought process. ‘All the residents of the Dharavi slums in Mumbai’, ‘every NGO in Calcutta’ and ‘all students below the age of 16 in Manipur’ are examples…

Writing a survey for a mobile app requires a different strategy than a survey taken with pen and paper or on a desktop computer. Mobile data collection is a completely different experience than standard surveys, and a mobile-friendly survey should reflect that. Below are some strategic and technical elements to consider when designing a survey for a mobile platform. 1.…

Data is undoubtedly valuable. It offers unprecedented insights into past trends and future predictions that few other non-numerical sources can match, making it an invaluable resource in policy making and social, political and economic understanding. However, data can only be useful if it is accurate and reliable. There are some major obstacles that can stand in the way of credible data collection…

The road to a good monitoring and evaluation system is paved with a sound baseline survey. A survey is an integral part of effective data collection and analysis. While it might seem obvious that baseline information is necessary to understanding the cause and/or effect of any study or policy implementation, baseline surveys often don’t get the attention and effort they…

What Is Probability Sampling? Population sampling is the process of picking a representative subset of a population, in order to conduct research over the entire population. While the most accurate results can be obtained if the entire population is considered, it is neither feasible nor practical. This is exactly why the Census of India, which covers every Indian citizen, is…

What is sampling? Sampling is the process of selecting entities (e.g., people, organizations) from a population of specific interest. By studying this sample, we can generalize our results back to the larger population from which the sample was chosen. There are two main types of sampling methods: probabilistic and non-probabilistic. In probabilistic or random sampling, the sample population is selected…